Man being fingerprinted

Arrest Record & Bail

Many factors go into play when a defendant gets arrested, and the judge decides on whether or not to issue that person a bail amount.

Some people see the inside of a jail cell more than others do because they repeat the same crimes multiple times. Could that cause a judge to say enough is enough and deny the person bail? Perhaps. The final decision about bail had to do with the following areas of examination:

The Nature of the Crime

The first thing that the judge will look at is the nature of the crime. What kind of crime was it? The severity of the crime plays a large role in bail situations. Murder, for instance, gets no bail because it is a crime of the most heinous nature. People who break out from prison do not get bail for the obvious reasons. A light drug offense is likely to have a very small bail amount. Aggressive and violent crimes will probably have high bail amounts because they involve physical harm to other people. The judge may place a high bail on such a crime to deter the person from getting out and (theoretically) tormenting the victim.

The Person’s Criminal History

A judge will review the defendant’s criminal history, including the arrest records. A long history of crimes will surely persuade the judiciary member to institute some level of bail. And yes, he or she would most likely deny bail for a person who has been arrested hundreds of times. The logic would be that the assailant may get out of jail and get into additional trouble. There is no set number of arrests or convictions that mandate a bail denial, but a judge can certainly deny it with “numerous subsequent arrests” as the reason.

The Chance of the Person Skipping Court
Another factor that the judge will consider before he or she makes a decision about the bail is the flight factor. The judge will consider how much of a chance there is that this person might just run to another state or country. Previous flights are good indications that such a thing will happen. Something in the person’s record may indicate a strong need for a bail denial, as well. If the judge feels squeamish about giving the defendant a bail, then the defendant may just be out of luck.

The Judge
Finally, it all depends on the judge and how that person feels about the situation. A judge in one jurisdiction may grant bail, and a judge in another jurisdiction may not. It all depends on the person’s experience level, attitude and personal feelings.

What to Do if You’ve Been Arrested and Need Bail Money
If you have been arrested and need bail money, then you must contact a bail bond company in your area. If someone you know is in jail on bail, you can contact the bail bond company for that person. Many bail bond companies are open, and they want to help people get free. Bail bondsmen cannot assist if a judge revokes or denies bail, but they can surely help if you or someone you know need bail paid. The first step in the process is making the initial contact. The bail bond company will take a little bit of information and may try to prequalify you. If not, then you will have to visit the facility with some of your documentation so the bail bondsman can help you. The person who performs your intake will look at your pay documents, identification and any other information you disclose. That person will then let you know what you need to do to get bail bond help.

The bail bondsman can go to the jail and get your loved one out as soon as you pay the fee. Some offices take several hours; others can get the job done faster. Your loved one will be expect to show up to court on time. Legal repercussions will occur if the assailant skips bail and ignores the court hearing. One of those repercussions is that bail will be automatically denied if that person ever needs help getting out of trouble again.

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