Hayward Jail

The Hayward, California Jail is a police detention facility staffed by civilian correctional officers and certified by the Board of Corrections as Type I* in operation at all times holding as many as 30 inmates. The jail processes all arrests for the City of Hayward, registers arson, drug, and sex offenders by appointment, and performs public but not immigration finger-printing Mondays to Fridays from 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM and Saturdays from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM. Court-ordered booking involving photographs, fingerprints, and identification checks is available Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM.

Visitation for up to 20 minutes subject to inmate processing availability is from 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM daily via video link for adults over 18 and minor children accompanied by a parents or qualified adult guardians. Visitors are subject to background checks and must have valid government-issued photo identification. The jail releases most inmates within 24 hours of their arrests and after 96 hours transfers them to the Alameda County Jail in Dublin.

Police take arrested persons to the jail for booking or processing that can require several hours. Arrestees are fingerprinted, photographed, scanned for warrants, relieved of their personal property for safekeeping, and taken to holding cells. Arrestees may have phone access for outgoing but not incoming calls.

After booking, the inmate has an opportunity to bail out. The Hayward Jail staff has a bail schedule set annually by Alameda County judges. For an inmate arrested for drug possession, the staff looks at the bail schedule for the amount for that charge.

Posting a bail bond is a contractual undertaking by a bail agency, a surety, and an intermediator, usually a friend or relative, as a financial assurance to the court that the defendant will appear as ordered. For this service, the bail agent charges a premium, generally 10 percent of the bail amount per the California Department of Insurance standard, and may require collateral, a bail bond contract, or both depending on circumstances. Sometimes a defendant can bail out with only the signature of a responsible intermediator, sometimes on only personal recognizance and promise to appear, and sometimes aggravating circumstances drive bail amounts upward. Risk of flight based on personal circumstances is always the primary determinant.

Inmates on probation or parole may be held without bail until their supervising authorities review their arrests and decide whether to permit pretrial release. Such review may take several days. Inmates who do not bail out or obtain release usually transfer to the Glenn Dyer Detention Facility in Oakland or the Santa Rita Jail in Dublin pending disposition of their cases.

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* “‘Type I facility’ means a local detention facility used for the detention of persons for not more than 96 hours excluding holidays after booking. Such a Type I facility may also detain persons on court order either for their own safekeeping or sentenced to a city jail as an inmate worker, and may house inmate workers sentenced to the county jail provided such placement in the facility is made on a voluntary basis on the part of the inmate. As used in this section, an inmate worker is defined as a person assigned to perform designated tasks outside of his/her cell or dormitory, pursuant to the written policy of the facility, for a minimum of four hours each day on a five-day scheduled work week,” California Board of State and Community Corrections, Minimum Standards for Local Detention Facilities, Title 15 Title 15-Crime Prevention and Corrections, Division 1, Chapter 1, Subchapter 4, Article 1, § 1006.

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